Category Archives: Configuration

OctoPrint installation on Orange PI PC – Printer Settings

After  defining the local hostname resolution

Local Hostname Resolution

at this point it is necessary to configure the printer.

WARNING: Use of the settings shown is at your own risk. We assume no responsibility if these settings cause malfunctions or breakage of the printer.

At the first access to OctoPrint, the basic parameters for managing the printer are requested. In our case, we connect the Orange PI PC to an Anet A8 3d printer via the USB port. At the first access to the address

http://3dprinter.local

 a configuration mask is shown

octoprint-accesspressing next we access the next screen where to define the user who manages the printer with his password

octoprint-accesscontrolWe press Keep Access Control; the next step is  the control of the Internet connection in which we disable the Connectivity Check

octoprint-accessconnectivityWe have to import our cura profile for Anet A8 and set  the path to the executable CuraEngine, compiled in the previous article

Octoprint Installation

octoprint-printerprofile

octoprint-curaengine

The imported profile must be generated by Cura 15.04.x or older. Below is the link to the various versions of the Cura software

Cura

We can now define the parameters of the printer, in our case Anet A8

octoprint-printer1We set the bed size and print volume

octoprint-printer2The speed of movement using the control panel is defined in the next step; we set up conservative parameters

octoprint-printer3Finally, we set the extruder parameters

octoprint-printer4

At the next screen we set the commands to be sent to Debian directly from OctoPrint; they are set as follows

octoprint-command

where in the password you must enter the password to run the root commands on Debian.


The folder in which Octoprint has been installed is inserted for the software update

octoprint-swupdateWe do not insert anything for the webcam

octoprint-webcamFinally, the configuration is completed with the Finish button.

octoprint-finishFor more OctoPrint settings and addons refer to the site

OctoPrint

In the next article we’ll print a test model.

OctoPrint installation on Orange PI PC – Local Hostname Resolution

After configuring haproxy for the use of content in http on the standard port

HAProxy Installation

we configure the Linux machine to publish the hostname on the network with the avahi daemon.

On Linux and OSX machines this service is natively visible, while for Windows systems it is necessary to install the Bonjour service

Bonjour application for windows

On the Orange PI PC the avahi daemon must be installed with the command

We change the name to which our 3D print server must match in the two files /etc/hosts and /etc/hostname

In our case the name orangepcpc has been changed to 3dprinter.

Restarting the linux box, the services are accessible  using the name 3dprinter.local.

avahiIn the next article we’ll show a printer configuration

Printer Settings

OctoPrint installation on Orange PI PC – HAProxy Installation

After the automatic start of OctoPrint configuration

OctoPrint Autostart

at this point we can set up the system to answer to the standard port of an Http server.

For this purpose we install and configure the HAProxy reverse proxy

HAproxy

Proceed to the installation

Edit the /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg file and add to the default the directives including also the use of webcam

Restart the proxy with the command

Restart the Orange PI. If everything is configured correctly, the 3D print server answers on port 80  of the Orange Pi PC ip address

http://ORANGEPIPC_IP

haproxyIt is possible to map the Octoprint service on port 5000 only to the loopback interface by editing the file ~/.octoprint/config.yaml

and adding the host reference under the server directive

Restart OctoPrint

Now the 5000 port is mapped only with the address 127.0.0.1.

In the next article, we’ll configure Linux to publish the hostname on the network so that it can be accessed through this reference without using the IP address

Local Hostname Resolution

OctoPrint installation on Orange PI PC – Autostart

After the installation of OctoPrint and CuraEngine in the previous article

OctoPrint Package Installation

we treat now the configuration of the 3d print server.

As first operation, we set up the automatic startup of OctoPrint.

Run the following commands

Edit the /etc/ defaults/octoprint file changing the pointing to the executable to start OctoPrint using vi

or nano

and edit the file from

to

taking into account also the different user being used.

Add the script to startup automatically OctoPrint

Start OctoPrint  with the command

Check that OctoPrint is active on port 5000 of the Orange PI PC by accessing the address

Rebooting the Orange PI PC, the OctoPrint server now starts automatically.

In the next article, Linux will be configured to connect to OctoPrint on the Http standard port, i.e. on  port 80

HAProxy Installation

Enigma 2 – How to read the contents of an image

In the previous article

OpenaATV Enigma2 image compilation

we built an Enigma2 image.

This shows how to view the content  of an Enigma2 image.

As an example we will always use the image for Zgemma H2H.

In a Linux environment, Debian 8 in our case, download the image to a folder, for example enigma2

enigma2 imageIn a terminal unzip it with the command

In the unpacked folder we have several files

rootfsWhat we are interested in is rootfs.bin.

The command

provides informations about the file type. In the case of rootfs.bin

ubithe command indicates that this is an image with ubi filesystem.

Now install the memory technology device utilities as the first step. In a terminal run

To view the contents run

The file  content is now visible under /mnt/ ubifs

ubimountTo unmount the filesystem run

Finally to  detach the UBI from the mtd device use the command

Below the links to find more informations about mtd and ubi filesystem

UBIFS

Linux MTD UBIFS

LEDE on Linkit 7688 Duo – Timecheck example

After the Python ad Firmata example

Firmata and Python

in this example we use the following programming model

duo-yun-bridge

We enable the board to work like Arduino Yun

Linkit 7688 Duo Arduino Yun

As specified in the Mediatek link, you must enable the bridge on the board; from a terminal in Lede run

At the reboot go to the Arduino Ide and choose File->Examples->Bridge->TimeCheck

timecheck_arduino-1-6-5We used the 1.6.5 Arduino Ide; we had issues whith the 1.8 version to build the sketch.

From the Arduino Ide, after the code upload, go to Tool->Serial Monitor to open the serial monitor

timecheckThe serial monitor window shows the current time.

After that, to run the other examples , disable the bridge setting with the commands

LEDE on Linkit 7688 Duo – Firmata and Python

After the python test in the previous article

LEDE on Linkit 7688 Duo – MPU-MCU Uart communication

here we describe how to do the same operation using the Firmata  python library

Firmata Protocol

In this case, the programming model is the following

duo-firmata-archAs first step,  described in the Mediatek article

Using Firmata with Python

we install the Firmata python library; in a linux terminal on LEDE run

In the Arduino IDE choose File->Examples->Firmata->StandardFirmata

arduinofirmataMake the following change in sketch code:

Look for the code

Firmata.begin(57600);
  while (!Serial) {

and replace it with

  Serial1.begin(57600);
  Firmata.begin(Serial1);
 
  while (!Serial1) {

Save the file and perform the compilation and upload on the Linkit 7688 Duo.

In a linux terminal  in Lede create the blink_with_firmata.py file and copy the following code inside

Save and quit.

Always in a linux terminal run now

The LED on the card should turn on and off.

Below is the link to download the two files  ready for the Link 7688 Duo

 Lede Python Firmata files

In the next article we’ll enable the board to work like Arduino Yun

LEDE on Linkit 7688 Duo – Timecheck example

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Articles List

Below is a list of the  articles to follow  to build your IOT environment consisting of sensors and relays with Beaglebone, ESP8266 and MQTT Mosquitto server.

  1. Architecture and Mqtt protocol
  2. Mosquitto Mqtt installation on Beaglebone
  3. Mqtt on ESP8266
  4. Temperature sensor on ESP8266 with Mqtt protocol
  5. Relay on ESP8266 with Mqtt protocol
  6. Configuration of Http server, Mqtt websocket protocol on Beaglebone
  7. Freeboard dashboard installation and configuration on Beaglebone
  8. Android client to manage sensors with Mqtt protocol

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Android Client

After Mosquitto server, ESP8266 nodes and Freeboard configuration

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266-Mosquitto installation on Beaglebone

MQTT with BeagleBone and ESP8266-MQTT ESP8266

MQTT with BeagleBone and ESP8266 – MQTT on ESP8266 with temperature sensor

MQTT with BeagleBone and ESP8266 – MQTT on ESP8266 with Relay

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Freeboard

now we can proceed to use a Mqtt Client on an Android device.

In the Playstore various Mqtt applications are available

android mqttAfter the publishing and subscriber topics configuration in the Android client , analogous to what has been done for Freeboard widgets

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Freeboard

it is possible to monitor the sensor temperature and humidity, the devices status and send commands to the relay (Turn On, Turn Off, Status, Restart, Sleep) and to the sensor (Restart, Sleep, Status).

Here is a screenshot with some subcriber topic and publisher topics of our installation using MQTT Dashboard

android mqtt relayoffWith the relay on

android mqtt relayon

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Freeboard

After the Mqtt web client installation

MQTT with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – WebServer and MQTT WebSocket

let’s install now the dashboard freeboard

Freeboard

In a ssh commad shell go into the /var/www/html  folder on Beaglebone as root and clone the freeboard github respository; change the owner of the freeboard folder in www-data:www-data

With a web browser go to the freeboard  folder on Beaglebone webserver to access the dashboard

freeboard

We have to add now Freeboard additional plugins. We add the following

  •  freeboard-mqtt

Clone the https://github.com/alsm/freeboard-mqtt github

Download the mqtt paho javascript library

Paho mqtt javascript library

Here is the direct link to the library

mqttws31.js

Create the mqtt folder under the Freeboard plugins folder and copy the mqttws31.js and paho.mqtt.plugin.js files

Edit the paho.mqtt.plugin.js file and insert the reference to the mqttws31.js library in the external_scripts section; in this case too we have to change the folder and contents owner

Change the owner

Edit the /var/www/html/freeboard/index.html file and insert the reference to the paho.mqtt.plugin.js plugin in the heads.js section

  • Add the dynamic-highcharts plugin

Clone in a folder the github

Copy the plugin_highcharts.js to the folder /var/www/html/plugins/thirdparty and change the owner

Edit again the file /var/www/html/freeboard/index.html and add the plugin as done above

Access now the Freeboard dashboard and add the links to the temperature and humidity topics, the gauges and timeseries mesauring the values in real time and in a specific range of time . Here are some settings:

  • Datasource

freeboard datasource

  • Gauge

freeboard gauge

  • Timeseries

freeboard timeseriesChrome/Chromium browser allows to save the settings in a json file. This settings can be loaded locally or loaded from the web server, saving for example the dashboard.json file in /var/www/html/freeboard,  with the url

The image shows the Freeboad interface with various widgets showing the status and timeseries of the ESP8266 relay and sensors

freeboard dashboard

In these series of articles we configured the envinronment to access the Beaglebone using the beaglebone.local/beaglebone alias

Debian sd card setup for Beaglebone Black

but you can use anyway the Beaglebone IP tho access the services provided by the board.

In the next article we’ll treat the Mqtt Android client

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Android Client