Tag Archives: esp8266

Sensors Monitoring – Envinronment Setup 2

After the software components installation in the previous article

Sensors Monitoring – Eninronment Setup

we finish this operation with this article.

Infludb

The Influxdb is installed as indicated in the link

Influxdb

For Debian 9 we execute the following commands

Check that everything works correctly by connecting with the infludb client

infux

Nodered

We proceed to the installation of node.js

Then we proceed to  nodered installation, as indicated at the link

Nodered installation

To run nodered at the start up, we use the script available at the following link

Nodered autostart

We did not run the automated script, but executed the following steps

Edit /etc/init.d/nodered and change the user from pi to monitor, ie change the parameter

in

Run

Start  nodered

Check that nodered works by accessing the following link with the browser

http://dashboardora.local:1880

nodered

Restart the system and check that nodered starts automatically.

Proceed to the installation of the nodered add-ons

 

Grafana

We proceed to download the version for arm

Grafana for ARM

Enable and start Grafana

Access the system using the url

http://dashboardora.local:3000

Log in with the user admin and password admin; change the password

GrafanaOnce the new password has been set, the setup interface is available

Grafana2In the next articles we will execute the settings to be able to view the sensors data.

Reverse Proxy installation

To access the system through port 80 of the http server we use nginx as a reverse proxy

nginx

We disable apache

We proceed to the installation of nginx

Everything must be configured to access the two systems using the following links

http://dashboardora.local/nodered for nodered

http://dashboardora.local/grafana for grafana

For Grafana we follow the official documentation

Grafana proxy

We change the file /etc/grafana/grafana.ini by modifying the domain and root_url parameters; in our file the parameteres are modified  as follows

Then we configure nginx, creating the servizi file with the following contents in the /etc/nginx/sites-available folder

Here is the link of the nginx configuration

nginx configuration

We run the following command

and start nginx and grafana services

At this point it is possible to access the two services via the links

http://dashboardora.local/nodered

nodered-nginx

http://dashboardora.local/grafana

grafana-nginxIn the next article we start the configuration of the various modules needed for the sensors monitoring.

Sensors Monitoring – Envinronment Setup

In setting up the infrastructure for monitoring sensors made up of ESP8266 devices in previously published articles

Mqtt with Beaglebone ed ESP8266 – Freeboard

Freeboard had been set up to display the data coming from the sensors.

In this new series of articles, we  set up Grafana

Grafana Dashboard

as  environment to view the data of the various sensors.

We implement the environment, in this case,  on an Orange Pi PC board, but other arm or pc system can be used.

Below the architecture used in this series of articles

archGrafana

In these articles we’ll use the maximum authorizations for each environment, we will not use authorizations on mosquitto and no encrypted connections will be used. In a test environment this setting is fine, but in an operating environment it is necessary to set up the correct authorizations and possibly the encryptions in the connections in all environments.

We have installed our compiled version of Debian 9 Stretch for Orange PI PC. The image used is the following

Image Download

The monitor user was created during the Image setup, while the hostname was renamed in dashboardora. If not installed proceed to install the avahi daemon

In this way the services can be accessed by publishing the hostname, i.e. dashboardora.local.

Using the armbian utilities  disable ip6 on the system; to carry out this setting launch armbian-config

ipv6Disable1Proceed to diasble IPV6

ipv6Disable2

As a first step we install the  mqtt broker mosquitto

Install the http services and the databases Mysql and MySqlWorkbench

Apache2

and various prerequisites

Start apache

and check that the server responds to the web address, which in our case corresponds to http://dashboardora.local

apache

MySql

Debian 9  comes with MariaDB; you must set the password for the database administration user root with the following command

We set the root password and the ability to log in from other hosts as root

mariadb-secureThe other chosen options are listed below

mariadb-secure2

We install phpmyadmin for database management

At the next screen choose apache2

phpmyadminFinally choose NO

phpmyadmin1

Run the commands listed below

Check that the system works correctly by accessing via web browser by adding to the apache phpmyadmin address, in our case

http://dashboardora.local/phpmyadmin

phpmyadmin2

Log in with the database root credentials.

Mariadb must be enabled to accept connections from other hosts. To do this, go to the folder

and edit the 50-server.cnf file as root, changing the setting

in

To allow the root database user to be able to access from an external client, it is necessary to log on mariadb locally with his client and enable this option; therefore the following is performed

 

Mysql Workbench Installation on PC

Go to the following link

MySql Workbench

and download the version for your operating system; proceed with the installation.

For Linux the package is also available in the distribution repositories.

After configuring the connection, you access the MySql system control screen.

MySQLWorkbenchIn the next article we will continue the installation of the other components to be able to monitor the sensors

Sensors Monitoring – Envinronment Setup 2

MicroPython – MicroPython compiling for ESP8266 with additional modules

After the firmware build of the MicroPython firmware for esp8266 in the previous article

MicroPython – MicroPython compiling for ESP8266

we now show how build a module inside the firmware; this option optimizes the module execution and minimizes the size of the same on the device; the module is frozen into the firmware.

With the firmware compiled with the defaults, the following modules are available, listed in the REPL console with the command

standardmodulesNow let’s try to compile the firmware with the mqtt modules already inside. For this purpose, the module sources are copied to the umqtt folder under modules

umqttfolderWe proceed to recompile the firmware. From micropython/ports/esp8266 we run the following commands

We can see from the compilation log, that these modules are placed in the frozen state

frozenmodulesAfter uploading this firmware we obtain the following list of modules inside the firmware

firmwarewithmodulesIt is also possible to create the firmware with the modules not compiled and optimized, by copying the sources in the scripts folder under esp8266; in the specific case the sources must be placed as shown below

The modules are always visible in the firmware, but not optimized, so if you need some module it is convenient to copy it on the device during the coding  and in the last phase of the project compile the firmware with the frozen modules.

 

 

MicroPython – MicroPython compiling for ESP8266

After using in some examples the MicroPython firmware on the ESP8266 board

MicroPython – Nodes examples with DHT11, Relay and MQTT

this article shows how to generate the MicroPython firmware for the ESP8266 board.

The operating system used for this task is Debian 9, already encountered when we analyzed  the esptool utility

MicroPython – Python on embedded devices

Log on  with the operating system user on Debian 9, sviluppo in our case; under the home folder  create the Micropython folder and inside this folder the  esp8266 folder

The MicroPython source code is available at the following link

Github Micropython

Instructions to build the firmware for the ESP8266 are available at the link

MicroPython esp8266

Clone the repository

Download the cross compiler, as described here

Cross compiler

As indicated in the link above, download the source of the cross compiler always from the folder esp8266

Install the prerequisites for building

Proceed to the build of the cross compiler with the following commands

At the end of the build add the binary folder of the cross compiler to the PATH envinronment variable

Go into the micropython folder available under ~/Micropython/esp8266

Run

to add external dependencies.

Next step is the MicroPython cross compiler build

Finally we can build the ESP8266 firmware with the following commands

The firmware is generated under ports/esp8266/build folder with the name firmware_combined.bin.

Proceed to load the firmware with the command

where  /dev/ttyXXX is repalced with the actual serial port to which we connect the ESP8266 board.

In our case, the firmware upload was successful with the command

It is also possible to load the firmware_combined.bin image with the command

In the next article we’ll  analyze how to build the MicroPython firmware adding into the image additional MicroPython modules

MicroPython – MicroPython compiling for ESP8266 with additional modules

MicroPython – Nodes examples with DHT11, Relay and MQTT

In a series of articles seen previously  on Mqtt, Beaglebone and ESP8266

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Articles List

we have created the infrastructure for managing the ESP8266 nodes .

In this article we program the two ESP8266 nodes  using MicroPython instead of Nodemcu and Lua.

The infrastructure remains identical; on the Beaglebone there is Mqtt Mosquitto Server and Freeboard for the management of the mqtt topics, visualization and interaction.

The ESP8266 node examples with relay and DHT11 sensor use the umqtt MicroPython libraries, available on the site

umqtt simple

In the following examples, only the umqtt simple is used; in the code several delays have been inserted to allow the board to manage the messages and not run into errors; in the case the Mqtt server is not available the code restarts the board.

Below the code used for these examples.

Node with DHT11 sensor

  • boot.py: code executed at startup

  • umqtt/simple.py:  mqtt library

  • dht11.py: module for reading the temperature and humidity on the GPIO2

  • main.py: code executed after boot

  •  client_mqtt.py: Main module for node management

  • riavvia.py: service code to restart the module from uPyCraft

 

Node with relay

  • boot.py: code executed at startup

  • umqtt/simple.py: mqtt library

    • main.py: code executed after boot

    •  client_mqtt.py: Main module for node management

  • riavvia.py: service code to restart the module from uPyCraft

Below is the filesystem on ESP8266 for the relays sample

ESPFilesystemBy accessing Freeboard we have the same informations obtained with Nodemcu and LUA on ESP8266 nodes

FreeboardMicroPythonBelow are the screens with MQTT Dashboard installed on an Android smartphone, with the possibility to check the status of the relay, read the sensor parameters, restart and sleep the two nodes

MqttPublish

MqttSubscribe

Here are the links to download the two examples

DHT11 sensor sample

Relay sample

In the next article we will compile the MicroPython firmware for ESP8266

MicroPython – MicroPython compiling for ESP8266

 

 

 

 

MicroPython – MicroPython program structure

After reviewing various development tools for MicroPython in previous articles

MicroPython – Development tools Ampy – Eric

MicroPython IDE uPyCraft

in this article we briefly describe the main features of MicroPython. In particular, we examine the documentation relating to the ESP8266, but the concepts can also be extended to the other boards.

The documentation on the ESP8266 soc and MicroPython  is available at the link

ESP8266 MicroPython Documentation

At the link we can find all the informations necessary to implement the code on the card and the features of MicroPython as well as the differences compared to Python.

Here are the main points for coding in MicroPython:

  • MicroPython has a REPL (Read Evaluate Print Loop) console through the serial port to which the device is connected on which we can give the various MicroPython commands interactively.
  • The REPL console can also be accessed via connection to the IP address of the device by enabling the WEBREPL (Web Browser Interactive prompt) console

WebREPL Documentation

importing the webrepl package, enabling it and starting it at each device restart. To access the configured device, we can use the link

WEBREPL Access

or locally cloning it  from github

  • At the start of the device the system runs boot.py and after main.py.
  • The MicroPython libraries are available on the github at the link

MicroPython libraries

  • Additional packages

The additional modules can be downloaded from the link of the libraries presented above or downloaded with the upip utility (Package Manager) from the REPL console if available in the Python Package Index (PyPI) repository

PYPI

as described below

upip

Below is a simple example that connects to the router and allows us to access the MicroPython console with the browser and WEBREPL.

  • boot.py code

At the first access it is required to enable webrepl to be executed in the REPL console with the command

we can activate the service and the access password.

The procedure generates the webrepl_cfg.py file on the device.

After setting up and restarting, we access the web console by opening the locally cloned webrepl.html file with a browser

WebreplPressing connect and after entering the password ,set in the initial setup, we access the console

WebreplConnectedNow we install from the WEBREPL console, for example, the stat module using upip

To paste commands  execute Ctrl+A e Ctrl+V

WebreplupipIn this case the package was taken from the PYPI repository, unpacked and installed on the device.

We have noticed that some modules, although available on the repository, give an error during installation with upip; these modules are installed directly without using the upip utility,but by downloading the library from the site listed above and transferring the code to the device.

Here is the link of the code shown above

Webreplsample

Another option available is to build  the firmware with the required modules.

In the next article we will examine examples similar to what was done with LUA on ESP8266 in previous articles

MicroPython – Nodes examples with DHT11, Relay and MQTT

 

 

 

Micropython – Development tools Ampy – Eric

After the  uPyCraft  intallation in the previous article

MicroPython – IDE MicroPython uPyCraft

let’s now look at other tools available for the development in MicroPython for various platforms.

This article shows the operations to be performed on Windows and Linux.

First Python package to install is Ampy (Adafruit MicroPython Tool)

ampy

The tool is available in the python repositories, so it can be installed using the  pip tool.

In Windos run in a dos command prompt

Similarly in Linux run in a shell

The available commands are listed running

ampyAmpy allows the transfer, creation, viewing, and execution of files on the device.

As for the IDE you can install Eric, generic Python IDE

Eric

Eric does not allow communication from the IDE with the device as seen with uPyCraft; this task is delegated to Ampy. For the installation proceed as follows:

  • For Linux Debian 9 just run

The tool is available among the development tools; at the first execution it requires default settings

ericSettingsWe define the workspace location

ericWorkspaceand we have the access to the IDE

eric

  • For Windows download the zip

Eric

Unzip the zip into a folder from which we run it; install the prerequisites

Perform the eric installation at this point by double clicking on install.py

ericInstallWindowsThe program checks the prerequisites and completes the installation

ericWindowsProcedure

Clicking twice on eric6.py or running eric6 from a dos command prompt we run the program in the same way as seen for Linux Debian

ericWindows

In the next article we will briefly examine how a MicroPython program is structured

MicroPython – MicroPython program structure

 

Micropython – MicroPython IDE uPyCraft

After installing the firmware on the Nodemcu esp8266 DevKit board

MicroPython Firmware

let us now examine a development tool can be suitable for the development of Python code.

A tool that allows both to write code and upload it to the device is uPyCraft

uPyCraft

The tool currently works for Windows and from version 0.30 is also available for Linux; the source code is available at the link

uPyCraft Source

Here are the steps for Windows and Linux.

  • Windows

Once downloaded the package we must  run it as an administrator; the installation of the Monaco font is required

monaco-font

After the font installation,  we have the access to the IDE

upycraft-v0-29We set the Location in Tools->Preferences->Language Location

upycraftlocation

and the serial port paramenters in Tools->Preferences->Serial

upycraftserialsettingsWe plug the device into an USB port and set the serial port on uPyCraft

upycraftserialWe choose the device type; in this case it is ESP8266

upycraftdeviceBy clicking on the connection icon we access to the device and view the files on it

upycraftconnectionThe firmware installation expands on the device only the Python file boot.py

upycraftfilesystemThe tool allows to download examples of MicroPython code for the board, blink.py for example

examplesClicking the “Download and Run” button we load the code onto the device and run it

blinkIn this example the led of the Nodemcu DevKit blinks.

  • Linux

The tool is similar in the Linux version; once downloaded the package to which we have to assign  the execution right we run it. We must assign to the user the access to the serial port with the command, already seen above

In our case, on Debian 9, we have the following screens similar to what we saw on Windows.

In the uPyCraft IDE

upycraft-v0-30linuxWe set the Location in Tools->Preferences->Language Location

upycraftlocationlinux

and the serial port paramenters in Tools->Preferences->Serial

upycraftserialsettingslinuxWe plug the device into an USB port and set the serial port on uPyCraft

upycraftseriallinuxWe choose the device type; in this case it is ESP8266

upycraftdevicelinuxBy clicking on the connection icon we access to the device and view the files on it

upycraftconnectionlinuxThe firmware installation expands on the device only the Python file boot.py

upycraftfilesystemlinuxThe tool allows to download examples of MicroPython code for the board, blink.py for example

exampleslinuxClicking the “Download and Run” button we load the code onto the device and run it

blinklinuxAs in Windows the led of the Nodemcu DevKit blinks..

In version 0.30 for Windows we noticed some bugs, so for this operating system we continue to use the uPyCraft  version 0.29.

Further informations about uPyCraft can be found at the following site

uPyCraft Documentation

In the next article we will discuss another Python development tool

MicroPython – Development tools Ampy – Eric

MicroPython – Python on embedded devices

In this article we begin to treat MicroPython

MicroPython

an implementation of Python3

Python

for embedded devices.

Various images are available on the MicroPython website for different devices, including the modules esp8266 and esp32

MicroPython Dowloads

We start our tests with a Nodemcu esp8266 DevKit

Nodemcu Devkit

We proceed to load the firmware  on this card.

The Micropython site also refers how to load the firmware on the cards; these informations are available at the link

MicroPython Tutorial for esp8266

To load the firmware we always use the tool esptool, also available on the Python repository.

To be able to use it, we need to install Python3 on our development platform. Here are the steps to follow for Windows and Linux.

  • Windows

For windows we must first install the Python3 environment, available at the following link

Python for Windows

In our case, we downloaded the  version 3.6.4 for 64-bit systems. We installed the package  with administrative rights

setuppythonAfter proceeding to add Python in the Path we click “Install Now”

pythonsetupendAfter the installation, we open a dos command propmt and check the installed Python version

pythonversionAlways from the dos command prompt we proceed to the installation of esptool with the command

esptoolinstallationAt this point we can proceed to the MicroPython firmware upload on the Nodemcu esp8266 DevKit. Of course, it is necessary to have the serial-ttl drivers installed for your DevKit model on Windows. Now go into  the folder where the firmware has been downloaded  and run the following  commands from the dos command prompt

erase_flashProceed to load the firmware

firmware_flashOnce the firmware is installed  we log on the Python console using, in our case with the nodemcu card DevKit, the same port already used to load the firmware.

On Windows we can use Putty

Putty

and set the serial connection to 115200 baud rates

repl_putty

  • Linux

For Linux we use the Debian 9 distribution, but the procedure can be extended to other distributions. After installing Debian 9 , similar to version 8

Debian 8

we proceed to the installation of Python3 and esptool from a Linux shell

Add the user used on Debian to the dialout group

In our case, using  sviluppo as a user, the command is as follows

Let’s move on to install the Python esptool package

We can then proceed with the installation of the firmware in the same way as done on Windows.

We check on which serial port the card is available (ttyUSBX)

ttylinuxWe perform a flash erase and firmware upload

To log on the DevKit we use screen

Here is the manual of the tool

Screen Manual

To detach from screen press

instead to resume run

To quit screen

Once connected you get the same result as Windows

screenIn the next article we will begin to see which IDEs can be used to create and load our Python code

MicroPython IDE uPyCraft

 

Mqtt with Beaglebone and ESP8266 – Articles List

Below is a list of the  articles to follow  to build your IOT environment consisting of sensors and relays with Beaglebone, ESP8266 and MQTT Mosquitto server.

  1. Architecture and Mqtt protocol
  2. Mosquitto Mqtt installation on Beaglebone
  3. Mqtt on ESP8266
  4. Temperature sensor on ESP8266 with Mqtt protocol
  5. Relay on ESP8266 with Mqtt protocol
  6. Configuration of Http server, Mqtt websocket protocol on Beaglebone
  7. Freeboard dashboard installation and configuration on Beaglebone
  8. Android client to manage sensors with Mqtt protocol